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Percutaneous Renal Cryoablation: A Single Institutional Experience
Sutchin R. Patel, M.D., Meghan G. Lubner, MD, James L. Hinshaw, MD, Christopher L. Brace, MD, Sean P. Hedican, MD, Fred T. Lee, MD, Stephen Y. Nakada, MD.
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.

BACKGROUND:
Despite excellent short term results, questions remain regarding the long term efficacy of renal cryoablation. The purpose of our study was to review the efficacy and complication rates for percutaneous cryoablation for small renal tumors.
METHODS:
One-hundred consecutive percutaneous renal cryoablations were performed in 95 patients between 2003 and 2010 at our institution. Patient medical records and imaging studies were reviewed. Information extracted included: demographic data, tumor size, length of follow-up, presence of residual tumor or local progression, complications and length of hospital stay. Follow-up imaging was conducted with contrast enhanced CT or MRI.
RESULTS:
The mean patient age was 66 years. Mean tumor size was 2.3cm ± 0.78. The mean follow-up was 18.8 months ± 0.78 (range 3-64.9 months) with a subset of 28 patients with > 2 years follow-up and 50 patients with > 1 year follow-up. Residual tumor was noted on imaging <6 months after treatment in 7 patients (7.1%). All of these patients received repeat treatment with no recurrence noted on follow-up imaging. One patient developed local tumor progression > 6 months following treatment. The mean length of hospital stay was 1.0 days ±0.46 (range 1-4 days). There were no major complications. Minor complications (7.1%) included 5 perinephric hematomas, 1 body wall paresthesia and 1 small pneumothorax that did not require a chest tube.
CONCLUSIONS:
Percutaneous renal cryoablation is a safe and effective treatment for small renal tumors. A larger number of patients with greater than 5-year follow-up is needed to better assess its long term efficacy.


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